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# 2021

WEEE lights

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Using electronic waste to produce sustainable, low cost lighting solutions

The WEEE Light project proposes a lighting system made from electronic waste which provides indoor lighting for 6 houses for at least 4 hours per day. This could be used to replace harmful and expensive kerosene lamps which are commonly used in vulnerable places like Agbogbloshie, Ghana; the world’s largest e-waste dumpsite. There, many locals work as informal e-waste recyclers and live in urban slums surrounding the dumpsite. This project proposes a lighting system which generates energy using an 80W reclaimed solar panel in conjunction with a wind turbine made from repurposed white goods, and a stepper motor as the generator.

Kiara Taylor

  • Kiara Taylor

    Kiara Taylor

    Loughborough University

    I am a Design Engineer aiming to create sustainable products which are accessible by all. After completing my Master's degree at Loughborough University, I would like to become an expert in understanding how to create a business that is environmentally and socially sustainable as well as profitable. These values are important to me as they are essential in maintaining a balanced ecosystem and quality of life for everyone. After achieving this, I aim to have a consultancy that specialises in advising leading companies on how to transform their businesses to become more sustainable. I want to help drive change in multinational companies to eradicate their reputation for being synonymous with unethical practices and negative environmental impacts and shift away from greenwashing.more

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