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# 2021

IMO – Contactless Vaccination

About

A spray-based vaccination delivery method, improving safety and reducing waste

Makeshift vaccination sites and mass vaccinations have been the response to the pandemic until now. The consequence of this is often overworked medical staff and large amounts of hazardous waste caused by disposable syringe use. IMO proposes a more sustainable vaccination technology; spraying the vaccine onto the skin. The vaccine is absorbed slowly into the skin thus giving the body enough time to get used to it, avoiding shock reactions, and reducing the need for follow-up monitoring. The vaccine can be applied anywhere on the skin which allows also untrained staff to administer vaccinations.

Graduates

  • Paul Ullrich

    Paul Ullrich

    Muthesius University of Fine Arts and Design

    We are a multidisciplinary team of Industrial Design students with a focus on Medical Design. After completing our studies at Muthesius Kunsthochschule, we look to launch a career focus on healthcare products and systems, as well as developing sustainable solutions for the society of tomorrow. more

  • Julia Berg

    Julia Berg

    Muthesius University of Fine Arts and Design

    We are a multidisciplinary team of Industrial Design students with a focus on Medical Design. After completing our studies at Muthesius Kunsthochschule, we look to launch a career focus on healthcare products and systems, as well as developing sustainable solutions for the society of tomorrow. more

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